Pumping water

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Pumping water

Post  Guest on Thu Oct 22, 2015 2:40 am

This is and expansion to the hunting post so everyone knows how we pumped water into out reservoir of the Terry.

Kelee came up with this Idea, we have water pumps that we didn't know we purchased until we came home with our rain barrel that Kelee had to have, one of those special buys she finds.
The rain barrel came with a little 120 volt pump that is used to pump water out of the rain barrel or make a fountain in the rain bearrels to keep the water moving. We were using it for the bath tub to pump the water out but it has many uses.

So to get to the point to pump water into the reservoir of the 5th wheel we took the 400 watt inverter that plugs into the power outlet of any vehicle, the pump, 2 X 15 liter water jugs and the ATV. went to the small creek running 150 yards away and set up. I plugged the inverter into the ATV and plugged the pump into the inverter and turned it on to make sure the pump would run. Low and behold it did. So i put he pump into the water away from the shore and submerge it about 10 inches of water to make sure no surface material would get into the pump. Turn the pump on and filled the 2 water jugs strapped to the front of the ATV. I used the on off switch of the inverter to turn the pump on.

When I got the water back to the Terry I poured the water into a pail immersed the pump and plugged it into the invert I set up for the Terry solar system. Continue to pour the water into the pail as the pump, pumped the water into the reservoir of the Terry. Life is good we can use our water and fill the tank as needed.

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Re: Pumping water

Post  tygerkittn on Fri Oct 23, 2015 10:09 pm

That's awesome! We don't really have a solution for water, other than some kiddie pools to catch rain water.

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Catching water in the rain

Post  Guest on Mon Oct 26, 2015 4:14 am

You say you only have a kiddy pool to catch water, try a tarp, dig a large flat hole and place a tarp in the hole to catch the rain water, doesn't have to be deep just about 10 inches deep with a large tarp you will be amazed how much water you will catch. Remember the large the area that caches water the more water you will catch. The only problem after that is storage of water, how much rain you get and the sun breaking down the tarp over time.

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Re: Pumping water

Post  tygerkittn on Mon Oct 26, 2015 11:42 pm

Thanks! We have a few tarps, maybe time to buy some more! Maybe an extra shovel, too, since water is the most important prep.
We do have a 55 gallon drum, but with 6 kids that won't last too long. I also have some cases of bottled water in the garage, but again, it's hard to store enough water for a large family for a long time.

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Trailer water

Post  Guest on Tue Oct 27, 2015 4:50 am

Hi Tigerkittn, I will take pictures of my set up for the Terry trailer to fill the reservoir, I'm going to use the ATV trailer to collect water since we are getting a lot of rain tomorrow.  I'm going to put the tarp in the trailer and up the sides to use the walls of the trailer to contain water with the tarp.





Last edited by Parkerhale308 on Sun Nov 15, 2015 6:31 am; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Pumping water

Post  tygerkittn on Wed Oct 28, 2015 10:05 am

I look forward to the pictures!
It's hard to do much on such a small lot here (1/4 acre). It's a corner lot so we really only have a small fenced space behind the house that's usable, anything seen from the road is subject to fines from code enforcement. I'd like to put in a cistern but it's probably not possible. I'd love a well, but too expensive and probably not legal.

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Re: Pumping water

Post  ZRT on Sun Nov 22, 2015 5:21 pm

tygerkittn wrote:I look forward to the pictures!
It's hard to do much on such a small lot here (1/4 acre).  It's a corner lot so we really only have a small fenced space behind the house that's usable, anything seen from the road is subject to fines from code enforcement. I'd like to put in a cistern but it's probably not possible. I'd love a well, but too expensive and probably not legal.
Damn were do you live? a home owners association? seems strict
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Re: Pumping water

Post  tygerkittn on Wed Nov 25, 2015 10:38 pm

The whole county is a homeowner's association. The developers have the politicians in their pocket. I got a ticket for having the garage door open-WHILE WE WERE INSTALLING THE NEW ONE. Possible fine of $1000 and six weeks in jail, turned out it was "only" $250.
We've also gotten a ticket for "Outdoor storage" because the kids' bikes were in the backyard, and a verbal warning because we had a swingset in the back yard. This place is a nightmare. Never move to Gwinnett County!

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Re: Pumping water

Post  Jonas Parker on Tue Feb 02, 2016 8:47 am

Tygerkittn, if you have a bathtub or two in your house, get a "Waterbob" emergency water storage system for each bathtub. These will allow you to store about 100 gallons of water in each tub. Don't forget unscented chlorine bleach to treat drinking water.
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Storing water

Post  Ozarks_1 on Wed Feb 03, 2016 6:33 am

Tygerkittn, have you considered a vertical water storage tank made of poly?
Maybe you've got a bit of space in a corner somewhere?

Dimensions for a typical 75-gallon tank: 23" wide, 49" tall (approx the same size as a common 40-gallon household water heater)
Price: about $120

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Re: Pumping water

Post  tygerkittn on Thu Feb 04, 2016 12:30 am

Ozarks_1 wrote:Tygerkittn, have you considered a vertical water storage tank made of poly?
Maybe you've got a bit of space in a corner somewhere?

Dimensions for a typical 75-gallon tank: 23" wide, 49" tall   (approx the same size as a common 40-gallon household water heater)
Price: about $120

We've got a 55 gallon blue drum-type thing in the basement, the problem is that with six kids, we need a huge amount of water, I'd like to get a well someday. If we're using 8 gallons a day, that drum is just a week's worth.
As soon as we can afford it, I'm getting each of the kids a lifestraw water bottle. Those look wonderful!
I really envy people with wells. I bought a book on digging wells, and the first thing we do if society collapses will be to start digging, hopefully our water table is low enough that stored water will last until we hit underground water.
I have no idea what the water table is, and even with google I couldn't figure it out.
Thanks for the advice!

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Re: Pumping water

Post  Ozarks_1 on Thu Feb 04, 2016 8:38 am

Simple definition of the term 'Water Table' : The depth at which underground water is found.

Information regarding the depth of the water table should be readily available through local/county/state agencies such as a county agricultural extension office. The info could also be obtained by asking a local well drilling company the average depth of the water table and depth of most of you area's wells - they are required by law (at least in my area) to maintain that info.
Please note, however, that 'water table level' and 'well depth' are not the same things. At our homestead, the well drillers hit water (the 'water table') at 80 feet - water output was 8 to 10 gallons per minute. We wanted more water availability than that, so the drillers went to 205 feet - at which point the drill dropped into an underground river of unknown depth - water output was 18 to 20 gallons per minute.
The water in a well between the 'water table' and the 'well depth' is known as 'standing water' - which is your "reserve".

The simplest way to visualize everything is to look at a glass half full of water ... The rim of the glass would be ground level. The level of the water would be the 'water table' and the bottom of the glass would be the 'well depth'. The water in between the two (the contents/reserve) is 'standing water'.

After visualizing the above explanation, it's clear that you'll hopefully have a HIGH 'water table' - not a low one. A high 'water table' is good when it comes to wells.

Hope this helps somewhat.

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